The Tax Implications of Investing in Bitcoin

Are profits from Bitcoin mining taxable in the US?

Hello!
I'm making a bitcoin mining rig which will be starting soon and I'm wondering what are, if any, taxes that are applicable to profiting from Bitcoin in the US.
Thanks for your help!
P.S. If you have any other tips for a newbie like me that'd be greatly appreciated.
P.P.S. If this is the wrong subreddit to post this in I apologize, I was gonna submit it to /bitcoin but then I read I should post questions here.
submitted by ActionWaters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I'm a pensioner spending my bitcoins(I mined)to pay bills each week. Is this taxable?

G'Day ppl
Its my first post so please forgive me if this topic has already been covered. I'm on a pension
I mine with GPUs and get payed with bitcoins (Nicehash) to help cover my bills each week
My pension is not enough to cover my mortgage and weekly bills hence I got into GPU mining
All that I mine is deposited into my Ledger wallet and I pay my bills via " Paybycoins" (was using previously LROS but their fees,markup are too high as well as using my coinjar swipe to pay for groceries (ETPOS)
Do I have to pay taxes on the bitcoins I mine as it all gets spent on bills?
Thanks in advance
submitted by Pensioner1234 to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

08-08 20:22 - 'Yes, the U.S. government requires you to pay taxes on any net gains you make. The two possible taxable events are acquisition (if you receive it as income or from mining) and disposition (when you trade it for something...' by /u/PinochetIsMyHero removed from /r/Bitcoin within 0-4min

'''
Yes, the U.S. government requires you to pay taxes on any net gains you make. The two possible taxable events are acquisition (if you receive it as income or from mining) and disposition (when you trade it for something else, whether cash or a boat or food or whatever).
Upon acquisition, unless you acquired it for its fair market value by paying for it, you have to pay taxes on it at its fair market price. In other words, if you get paid in BTC for mowing lawns or programming software, you pay taxes on it as income. If you trade for it, you pay taxes based on your gain (if any) in the transaction.
Upon disposition, you pay the difference between your basis cost and the present cost. In other words, if you bought some BTC at $240, and you sell it at $3288 to buy a boat, you pay taxes on the $3048 net gain. You may be required to prove your basis cost (especially if audited), i.e., the government may try to pretend you got it out of thin air and have to pay on the whole $3288.
[link]1
'''
Context Link
Go1dfish undelete link
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Author: PinochetIsMyHero
1: w****nvestope*ia.*om*unive*si*y/definit*ve-bitcoin-tax-gu**e**ont*l***irs-sno**yo*/
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Nine Countries That Don’t Tax Bitcoin Gains- time to move

Tax liability is a major source of concern for anyone invested in Bitcoin and other digital assets. In sum, some have described it as nothing short of a nightmare.
But while some countries are putting pressure on investors and levying taxes on income and capital gains from Bitcoin transactions, many are taking a different approach—often with the aim of promoting better adoption and innovation within the crypto industry. They’ve implemented friendlier legislation, and allow investors to buy, sell, or hold digital assets with no tax liability.
Here’s our list of the nine most crypto-friendly tax jurisdictions.
———————
  1. Belarus 🇧🇾
Belarus is taking an experimental approach to cryptocurrencies. In March 2018, a new law legalized cryptocurrency activities in the East European state, exempting individuals and businesses involved in them from taxes until 2023 (when it will come up for review.)
Under the law, mining and investing in cryptocurrencies are deemed personal investments, and so exempt from income tax and capital gains.
The liberal laws aim to boost the development of a digital economy, and technological innovation. The country was recently ranked third in Eastern Europe and 19th globally in levels of P2P crypto trading.
  1. Germany 🇩🇪
Germany offers a unique take on taxing digital currencies such as Bitcoin. Unlike most other states, Europe’s biggest economy regards Bitcoin as private money, as opposed to a currency, commodity, or stock.
For German residents, any cryptocurrency held for over a year is tax-exempt, regardless of the amount. If the assets are held for less than a year, capital gains tax doesn’t accrue on a sale, as long as the amount does not exceed 600 euros ($692).
However, for businesses it’s a different matter; a startup incorporated in Germany still needs to pay corporate income taxes on cryptocurrency gains, just as it would with any other asset.
  1. Hong Kong 🇭🇰
Hong Kong’s tax legislation on cryptocurrencies is a broad brush affair, even after new guidance was issued earlier this year.
Essentially, whether cryptocurrencies are taxed or not depends on their use, according to Henri Arslanian, a global crypto leader at PwC.
“If digital assets are bought for long-term investment purposes, any profits from disposal would not be chargeable to profits tax,” he wrote in March when the directive was introduced. But he added that this doesn’t apply to corporations—their Hong-Kong sourced profits from cryptocurrency business activities are taxable.
  1. Malaysia 🇲🇾
In Malaysia, cryptocurrency transactions are currently tax-free, and cryptocurrencies don’t qualify for capital gains tax, because digital currencies are not considered assets or legal tender by the authorities.
But the law is currently fluid; it only applies to individual taxpayers, and businesses involved in cryptocurrency are subject to Malaysian income tax.
And things may soon change. Mohamad Fauzi Saat, director of Malaysia’s tax department said in 2018 that Malaysia was committed to working towards issuing comprehensive guidelines on the tax treatment of cryptocurrency by the end of 2020.
  1. Malta 🇲🇹
The government of the so-called “Blockchain Island” recognizes Bitcoin “as a unit of account, medium of exchange, or a store of value.”
Malta doesn’t apply capital gains tax to long-held digital currencies like Bitcoin, but crypto trades are considered similar to day trading in stocks or shares, and attract business income tax at the rate of 35%. However, this can be mitigated to between five percent and zero, through “structuring options” available under the Maltese system.
Malta’s fiscal guidelines, published in 2018, also discriminate between Bitcoin and so-called “financial tokens,” equivalent to dividends, interest or premiums. The latter are treated as income and taxed at the applicable rate.
  1. Portugal 🇵🇹
Portugal has one of the most crypto-friendly tax regimes in the world.
Proceeds from the sale of cryptocurrencies by individuals have been tax-exempt since 2018, and cryptocurrency trading is not considered investment income (which is normally subject to a 28% tax rate.)
However, businesses that accept digital currencies as payment for goods and services are liable to income tax.
  1. Singapore 🇸🇬
Capital gains tax does not exist in Singapore, so neither individuals nor corporations holding cryptocurrency are liable.
But companies based in Singapore are liable to income tax, if their core business is cryptocurrency trading, or if they accept cryptocurrency as payment.
The authorities consider payment tokens such as Bitcoin to be “intangible property” rather than legal tender, and payment in the cryptocurrency constitutes a “barter trade” where the goods and services are taxed, but not the payment token itself.
  1. Slovenia 🇸🇮
Slovenia is another country that treats individuals and businesses separately under its cryptocurrency tax system.
No capital gains tax is levied on individuals when they sell Bitcoin, and gains are not considered income. However, companies that receive payment in cryptocurrencies, or through mining, are required to pay tax at the corporate rate.
Notably, the Mediterranean country doesn’t permit business operations in cryptocurrency alone (such as only accepting Bitcoin as payment.)
  1. Switzerland 🇨🇭
It’s no surprise that Switzerland, home to the innovation hub known as “Crypto Valley”, has one of the most forward-thinking tax policies too.
Cryptocurrency profits made by a qualified individual through investing and trading are treated as tax-exempt capital gains.
For the complete link to the written article - click here
Edit: hey thanks for the award, that was so awesome. Have a nice day everyone.
submitted by girlshero to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Dear Peasants: Mining Bitcoin at a loss, IS OK. Here's why.

Mining is still a completely anonymous way to acquire bitcoin. That's it. That's all I got for ya.
Most users are going to buy on Coinbase or Cash App or an exchange. These transactions will be forever recorded with those entities. And your paying a premium on nearly all exchanges. In this sense, you're buying Bitcoin at a loss, because it's fiat value drops immediately after the transaction.
If you're a farm, then I get it. You need to turn a profit to survive. However, hobby miners can float their electric bills and sell whenever the fuck they want, or HODL their anonymous stash.
submitted by RonTurkey to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Japanese retail giant Rakuten announces allowing users to use shopping points to exchange for bitcoin, etc., boosting cryptocurrency adoption

Japanese retail giant Rakuten now allows its customers to convert their Rakuten Group loyalty points into mainstream cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. According to an official announcement on December 24, Rakuten users in Japan can use this feature immediately, but they need to have an account in Rakuten Wallet, Rakuten's cryptocurrency exchange subsidiary. The company says its customers can convert their loyalty points into three different cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin, ETH and BCH. It is understood that Rakuten is not the only company that allows Japanese users to exchange loyalty program points into cryptocurrencies. In August 2019, the cryptocurrency exchange bitFlyer partnered with technology service company Tpoint Japan to enable its Japanese customers to convert loyalty program points into bitcoin and receive rewards paid in cryptocurrency. The increase in such companies means that Bitcoin will be accepted by more and more people. What do you think?
submitted by Emma5201 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Tax implications if/when selling claim for BTC

I have the opportunity to sell my bitcoin only claim for BTC to a private buyer. I will obviously be receiving less BTC than claimed, so what are the tax implications? Worst scenario is it counts as a sell when the trade is made and capital gains are owed. Or does it count as a sell when I eventually sell/spend the BTC (since they shouldn't have been stolen in the first place)? And so, am I required to declare the private sale on my taxes next year? Do I check.... the box?
I am meeting with my CPA tomorrow. Looking for any insight. HEPL
submitted by choadtrader to mtgoxinsolvency [link] [comments]

US Crypto Taxes- Explained

submitted by heist95 to CryptoMarkets [link] [comments]

Bitcoins Used to Pay for Products are Taxable Income, Wages Paid in Virtual Currency are Subject ... (current BTC/USD price is $9,223.52)

Latest Bitcoin News:
Bitcoins Used to Pay for Products are Taxable Income, Wages Paid in Virtual Currency are Subject ...
Other Related Bitcoin Topics:
Bitcoin Price | Bitcoin Mining | Blockchain
The latest Bitcoin news has been sourced from the CoinSalad.com Bitcoin Price and News Events page. CoinSalad is a web service that provides real-time Bitcoin market info, charts, data and tools.
submitted by coinsaladcom to CoinSalad [link] [comments]

08-18 03:45 - 'People, stop saying bitcoins is going to destroy "the financial system as we know it" (STORY)' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/graydoggames removed from /r/Bitcoin within 291-301min

'''
The last month I actually worked, I was earnings $2,165 per week. After taxes, I got to take home... $965. I don't even pay child support.
Federal tax, provincial tax, employment insurance, parental insurance, mandatory retirement plan (taken "from source" as they say it), medical insurance (mandatory), union fee, professsional order fee....
... all taken right from my pay and I couldn't say a word about it.
Of course, in addition to all that, I still needed to pay sales taxes (15%), property taxes (5k a year), gas taxes, school taxes................................................... Likewise, I had to pay parking at work every day, gas to go to work, dinner lunches, etc etc etc.
I did the math once, and from $2,165, after you count everything, I got to take home $500 IF I was lucky.
Less than 25% of what I earned was actually mine.
So, why am I telling you this?
Because at some point, I just... gave up. I didn't see it as "being worth it" anymore.
This is when I quit my job to pursue other passions. I ended up, amongst other things, on poker and cryptocurrencies.
Today, I earn way less than back when I was working, but I actually take a lot more home. I don't have to spend 2+ hours per day in traffic, find parking, obey bullshit orders from idiots that don't know anything but got higher positions because they are better at licking boots, and I don't have the frustration that I get from work. I have a lot more free time and am generally WAY happier.
__________________
So, again, why am I telling you this? Because as long as people are willing to pull up with this bullshit, nothing will change. I have a friend who STILL partake in that "rat race" ... except that he also has to pay child support. He takes even less home, yet he never even THINK about bitching about it.
To be clear, I am not anti-taxes, but can we fucking agree than if I earn $110,000 a year, I should take home more than $25,000?
Can we AT LEAST agree on that? That it's not worth it? My boss' daily BONUS (not even his wages) is more than $25,000 AND that is not taxable (it's a capital gains).
Do you think that's even remotely close to fair?
I see people here being VERY optimistic about bitcoins and to be honest, so am I. I made a promise to myself I wouldn't sell bitcoins until they reach 100k. I took cash advances on my credit card to buy bitcoins. That's how much I fucking love bitcoins. I really believe in it (And ether).
But even if bitcoins hits $1M, which I hope, it's not going to cause a dent in the financial system until people decice they have enough.
At $100,000 per bitcoins, the entire bitcoin market cap would be less than $2T, which is less than Apple, ONE company.
Add in the lost bitcoins (4M?) and we can see that even if bitcoin reaches $1,000,000, the entire market cap will be around $20T which, while huge, is insignificant in the grand scheme of things.
In the last four months alone, the FED has printed $6T. They basically created that money out of thin air and trust me, they are nowhere near done yet. That's 30x the current market cap of bitcoins, printed, invented, made up, you pick your own word.
Trump sent $1200 to every working american (and then some). Do the math.
To say that bitcoins can disrupt the financial system is simply fake. I'm not saying it's impossible, but it's insanely unlikely. It will not unseat banks, big corporations and other entities trying (and suceeding) to enslave us. Simply because these people can invent as much money as they want.
THIS is why I paid 75% in taxes by the way. Because my province keeps printing more and more money to give to their buddies. I could go on about how horrible this province is mismanaged (most corrupt in the country) or how they waste trillions year after year, how they give themselves huge bonuses and billions (see: Trudeau WE, commandites scandal, etc etc etc). That's money that they rob from YOU AND I.
They take your 75% income tax and fuck you in the ass with it. Trust me, you get far fewer services that you think you do. Again I'm not against taxation but 75% while those people steal billions is ludicrous.
And as long as people are willing to put up with it, nothing will change. Bitcoins cannot change the mentality of "I slave every day to enrich billionaires who don't give a shit about me." I quit working because it just wasn't worth it, but the vast majority show up day after day to enrich CEOs, corporations, shareholders, and the government.
The dollar is not backed on gold. It's backed by good will. Meaning, the faith that the printed money is backed by the economy. If people refuse to take part in the economy, or even use loopholes to partake in it as little as possible, THEN the financial system will crash. But as long as people obey orders and allow themselves to get ripped off (that $6T printed money will lead to either of two things: higher taxes, or higher inflation, or both), the system will survive, bitcoins or not.
Yes, bitcoin can help that financial system crash, but by themselves, no matter the price, they cannot "start" or "achieve" anything, even if they reach $1,000,000. Bitcoin entire market cap is peanuts compared to how much those people rob, year after year.
I'll conclude by saying the bitcoin's most important attribute is that there is a fixed number. Obviously you cannot print unlimited bitcoins like the FED is doing with money right now and in 5-10 years I would bet new bitcoins will be very, very rare. Bitcoin isn't going anywhere but up and I'm holding until it hits 100k MINIMUM. But to conclude, don't think it's anything but a blimp for the world's economy. An important blimp, but a blimp nonetheless.
'''
People, stop saying bitcoins is going to destroy "the financial system as we know it" (STORY)
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: graydoggames
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Bitcoin tax advice?

I just bought this Bitcoin investment for $13,750 and it has $500 a month passive income. During the sign up they had me fill out a W9 with my SSN and told me it's for getting a 1099-rental or something similar.
My question is, can I deduct the $13750 as an expense or not? I am considering going to a CPA but hoping someone can clear this up here instead. Thanks
Edit:
I forgot to say it's a fixed lease for 60 months (5 years, paid in Bitcoin), and I technically own the hardware, but they use it and pay $500 a month. They have an option to buy hardware for $1 in the contract. They also handle all the facilities and day to day operation.
submitted by android8080 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining

I've ventured into putting some money into a mining pool, what I've wanted to is how bad are taxes on Bitcoin? And can you be invested in multiple pools?
submitted by snowrider0693 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

It's Good Friday, and a millionaire is about to rise from the ashes (figuratively)! Comment to enter! [Drawing Thread #41]

Praise thy!

TL;DR of the TL;DR:
In Case You Missed It:
  • So I'm going to be unavailable for the next few hours. Quick notes, this thread will close at 0:00 UTC (8 PM ET) due to me being late by thirteen minutes. As a side effect, comment retrieval will occur, centered at 3:00 UTC (11 PM ET). Not good enough, I was not able to get online before that. 4:00 UTC (12 AM ET) it is! 5:00 UTC (1 AM). Apparently, Pydroid need a repository plug-in, whatever that means. Hope I stay up for that long.
  • The /millionairemakersmeta discussion thread is up, and be welcome to donate to the past winner.
  • UNDER CONSTRUCTION, though can't guarantee it'll get repaired.
TL;DR:
Leave a comment on this thread, replies won't count. A random user will be chosen, and everyone donates a dollar to make a millionaire. You are welcome to spread this thread via upvoting, telling friends and family, and sharing on social media!
  • [If you'd like to be reminded to donate to the winner through PM via the RemindMeBot, click here!](UNAVAILABLE)
What is this, anyway?
Three years ago, a Redditor posted an idea in /Showerthoughts that speculated the fact, if a million people picked a certain Redditor and all donated just $1, they would have the power to make someone a millionaire.
This subreddit is an embodiment of that showerthought, and the monthly drawings are the attempts to make it happen.
We need your help to keep this running, which amounts to only $1 a month to make someone's day. In the long term, that’s $120 every decade, which is much more affordable than other expenses. How does it work? Below, you will find an explanation on entering, rules to keep in mind, the selection, and other important things to note.
How to enter:
  • REQUIRED: Leave only one (1) top level comment in reply to this thread! Replying to other comments will not count. It is highly recommended to comment "RemindMe! 3 days Donation for /millionairemakers", which will remind you via PM to donate. That's it!
Important Rules:
  • Only ONE top level comment per person (replies and subsequent-level comments aren't included), but feel free to reply to other comments. Making duplicate top level comments may result in exclusion from entering. Go to me to ensure you don't accidentally double comment.
  • If, by any chance, you do double comment, delete any extra duplicates ASAP, ideally before the thread is locked, as any chosen draws found to violate this will not be eligible to win, and will be banned from the subreddit.
  • Your account must be older than 30 days with some amount of activity. Throwaway accounts with very minimal activity will also not be eligible. This is to prevent multiple entries from the same person.
How will the winner be picked and how can you donate?
  • After 24 hours, this thread will close, and the method of selection will begin.
  • While attempts to make the selection method similar to 2017’s have been performed, it still varies from the original. For an example from a prior drawing, see [Draw #36]. For archival purposes, please click here for the original selection method.
  • Method's TL;DR: Your number is assigned by sorting the comments by old, resulting in the first commenter being 1. The list of comments will be publicly released for the community to verify per their own accord. The subreddit then waits for a randomly generated block (a string of numbers) from Bitcoin's blockchain, after a preselected date and time, and calculates the winner using a formula described in the posts mentioned above.
  • Comment IDs are downloaded at 2:00 UTC, three hours following the thread being locked. There will be an official run at the time listed. If it is shown that there are any technical difficulties, the retrieval of the comments will be delayed by an hour, following the same procedures.
  • While not necessary, to determine if you are on the list, please go to your comment and save it. The comment ID is what gets recorded and selected, which looks like this: e3yxpj4.
  • The Draw is held at 16:00 UTC the Sunday after comments have been downloaded, unless stated otherwise. Using the Bitcoin blockchain, the third block yet to be mined will be used to select a winner.
  • The user who created the winning comment will be informed of their luck and will provide any information necessary for their chosen payment methods (mods will help set this up if needed).
  • The generous Reddit community donates to this lucky person, hopefully making some worthy soul a millionaire! A donation table will be stickied to the winner’s post, giving users the freedom in how they donate.
  • The lucky Redditor follows up with a thank you within the next days, revealing to the community exactly how much was raised and thanking their generosity.
Reminders
  • Take the time you have available now to setup your PayPal, Square Cash, and Google Wallet account, and/or cryptocurrency wallets. (Note: Some services may not be available depending on where you reside.)
  • To buy any cryptocurrencies, you may use Coinbase for purchases using your bank account.
  • To store cryptocurrencies, there are many accessible wallets, and if you win, you will be guided on which ones to download. For Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash, it’s recommended to use the Electrum and Electron Cash wallet for Mac, Linux, and PC.
  • Please try your best to donate a $1, no matter who wins. Every single dollar, cent, anything really counts, so please take the effort to remember and go through with it.
  • If you want to be reminded to donate, please comment "RemindMe! 3 days Donation for /millionairemakers".
  • Spread the word! The more people who participate, the better this gets for everyone! There has been a correlation between this subreddit making it in /all and an increase in donations.
  • Try to cross-post to relevant subs, and upvote. There is a correlation between reaching /all and the amount of donations for the winner. (Please don't spam other subs though. We're not trying to make any enemies here.)
  • If you are under 18, please talk to your parents to get their consent to participate and use their help to setup a PayPal account.
MOST IMPORTANTLY
Remember, this is about generosity, making history, and coming together to make someone's life better. It takes three minutes to donate a bit to the winner, whether you're well off and want to donate a couple bucks, or going through tough times and can only donate a few pennies. Every cent counts.
Note about legality: This is NOT a lottery. You don't have to pay to enter. No prizes are given away directly by the moderators of this subreddit (the moderators will never even touch your donations; this is done voluntarily). As for gift taxes, according to the IRS, they're paid by the donor, and any donations under $15,000 is not taxable.
If a lone $1 can get you stuff, imagine the possibilities with $1,000,000. You can get stuff, stuff, and stuff!
One million dollars can help do things. Spread the word: have your friends and family comment, post the link to your friendly-neighborhood social media network, and share it to anyone interested.
Let's make an egg-cellent millionaire!
haiku
(This is an altered generic template thread.)
submitted by lilfruini to millionairemakers [link] [comments]

Exam week is almost over, and with it comes making a millionaire! Comment to enter! [Drawing Thread #42]

I forgot to change the leading title.

Overslept. Comment collection will be performed on 10 AM ET (14:00 UTC), following standard procedure. Someone deleted their comment, there will be a second attempt at 11 AM ET (15:00 UTC), again via standard procedures. A trial will be performed a few minutes before the set time, right at the set time, and thirty minutes after. Drawing the winner will begin at 16:00 UTC.
TL;DR of the TL;DR:
  • To enter, comment only once to this post. Replies to other comments will not count. Good luck!
In Case You Missed It:
  • The /millionairemakersmeta discussion thread is up, and be welcome to donate to the past winner.
  • UNDER CONSTRUCTION, please wait!
TL;DR:
Leave a comment on this thread, replies won't count. A random user will be chosen, and everyone donates a dollar to make a millionaire. You are welcome to spread this thread via upvoting, telling friends and family, and sharing on social media!
What is this, anyway?
Three years ago, a Redditor posted an idea in /Showerthoughts that speculated the fact, if a million people picked a certain Redditor and all donated just $1, they would have the power to make someone a millionaire.
This subreddit is an embodiment of that showerthought, and the monthly drawings are the attempts to make it happen.
We need your help to keep this running, which amounts to only $1 a month to make someone's day. In the long term, that’s $120 every decade, which is much more affordable than other expenses. How does it work? Below, you will find an explanation on entering, rules to keep in mind, the selection, and other important things to note.
How to enter:
  • REQUIRED: Leave only one (1) top level comment in reply to this thread! Replying to other comments will not count. It is highly recommended to comment "RemindMe! 3 days Donation for /millionairemakers", which will remind you via PM to donate. That's it!
Important Rules:
  • Only ONE top level comment per person (replies and subsequent-level comments aren't included), but feel free to reply to other comments. Making duplicate top level comments may result in exclusion from entering. Go to me to ensure you don't accidentally double comment.
  • If, by any chance, you do double comment, delete any extra duplicates ASAP, ideally before the thread is locked, as any chosen draws found to violate this will not be eligible to win, and will be banned from the subreddit.
  • Your account must be older than 30 days with some amount of activity. Throwaway accounts with very minimal activity will also not be eligible. This is to prevent multiple entries from the same person.
How will the winner be picked and how can you donate?
  • After 24 hours, this thread will close, and the method of selection will begin.
  • While attempts to make the selection method similar to 2017’s have been performed, it still varies from the original. For an example from a prior drawing, see [Draw #36]. For archival purposes, please click here for the original selection method.
  • Method's TL;DR: Your number is assigned by sorting the comments by old, resulting in the first commenter being 1. The list of comments will be publicly released for the community to verify per their own accord. The subreddit then waits for a randomly generated block (a string of numbers) from Bitcoin's blockchain, after a preselected date and time, and calculates the winner using a formula described in the posts mentioned above.
  • Comment IDs are downloaded at 2:00 UTC, three hours following the thread being locked. (See addendum above.) There will be an official run at the time listed. If it is shown that there are any technical difficulties, the retrieval of the comments will be delayed by an hour, following the same procedures.
  • While not necessary, to determine if you are on the list, please go to your comment and save it. The comment ID is what gets recorded and selected, which looks like this: e3yxpj4.
  • The Draw is held at 16:00 UTC the Sunday after comments have been downloaded, unless stated otherwise. Using the Bitcoin blockchain, the third block yet to be mined will be used to select a winner.
  • The user who created the winning comment will be informed of their luck and will provide any information necessary for their chosen payment methods (mods will help set this up if needed).
  • The generous Reddit community donates to this lucky person, hopefully making some worthy soul a millionaire! A donation table will be stickied to the winner’s post, giving users the freedom in how they donate.
  • The lucky Redditor follows up with a thank you within the next days, revealing to the community exactly how much was raised and thanking their generosity.
Reminders
  • Take the time you have available now to setup your PayPal, Square Cash, and Google Wallet account, and/or cryptocurrency wallets. (Note: Some services may not be available depending on where you reside.)
  • To buy any cryptocurrencies, you may use Coinbase for purchases using your bank account.
  • To store cryptocurrencies, there are many accessible wallets, and if you win, you will be guided on which ones to download. For Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash, it’s recommended to use the Electrum and Electron Cash wallet for Mac, Linux, and PC.
  • Please try your best to donate a $1, no matter who wins. Every single dollar, cent, anything really counts, so please take the effort to remember and go through with it.
  • If you want to be reminded to donate, please comment "RemindMe! 3 days Donation for /millionairemakers".
  • Spread the word! The more people who participate, the better this gets for everyone! There has been a correlation between this subreddit making it in /all and an increase in donations.
  • Try to cross-post to relevant subs, and upvote. There is a correlation between reaching /all and the amount of donations for the winner. (Please don't spam other subs though. We're not trying to make any enemies here.)
  • If you are under 18, please talk to your parents to get their consent to participate and use their help to setup a PayPal account.
MOST IMPORTANTLY
Remember, this is about generosity, making history, and coming together to make someone's life better. It takes three minutes to donate a bit to the winner, whether you're well off and want to donate a couple bucks, or going through tough times and can only donate a few pennies. Every cent counts.
Note about legality: This is NOT a lottery. You don't have to pay to enter. No prizes are given away directly by the moderators of this subreddit (the moderators will never even touch your donations; this is done voluntarily). As for gift taxes, according to the IRS, they're paid by the donor, and any donations under $15,000 is not taxable.
If a lone $1 can get you a pencil, imagine the possibilities with $1,000,000. You can get preparation books, prepare for college, or even raise money for a graduation party!
One million dollars can help do things. Spread the word: have your friends and family comment, post the link to your friendly-neighborhood social media network, and share it to anyone interested.
Let's make a millionaire!
submitted by lilfruini to millionairemakers [link] [comments]

Tax time

Hey guys, just offering some help to those of you who are in my same situation.
I made a post on here last month about the fact that I haven’t filed crypto taxes for the three years that I have been trading. I didn’t turn many profits overall but during the course of trading I of course realized and lost gains and therefore had taxable events.
Because I didn’t turn much profit overall most of the comments or people assuring me not to worry about taxes and just ignore it - it’s crazy how many people thought it was a good idea to just withhold the information. I never wanted to do that and this is not a great idea because if you get audited it it’s only going to spell problems.
It took me a long time to go through all my trades, airdrop, mining, spending and transaction information to decide how I was going to consolidate it all. Then I found my saving grace.
There’s a service offered at bitcoin.tax that are going to save anyone that has been in my same situation as me both time and frustration. It only costs $30 US per filing year and only took about an hour to complete my tax prep using their service. They have a way for you to import trades from pretty much every exchange and wallet and consolidate it all for you.
What was an extremely stressful realization for me was made very easy, efficient and cost effective. So if you’re stressing because you don’t know what to do about taxes try bitcoin.tax.
I am not affiliated with this service in any way nor am I receiving any type of compensation for this post - just sharing a useful resource that I wish I happened upon while doing my tax research.
submitted by Mrmapex to BitcoinCA [link] [comments]

We're springing into a new season, and with it, a chance to be made a millionaire! Comment to enter! [Drawing Thread #40]

March onwards!

Updates (all of which are edited in):
These retrievals will start at 3:45 UTC, 4:00 UTC, and 4:30 UTC respectively.
TL;DR of the TL;DR:
  • To enter, comment only once to this post. Replies to other comments can be posted, but will not count as an entry. Good luck!
In Case You Missed It:
TL;DR:
What is this, anyway?
Three years ago, a Redditor posted an idea in /Showerthoughts that speculated the fact, if a million people picked a certain Redditor and all donated just $1, they would have the power to make someone a millionaire.
This subreddit is an embodiment of that showerthought, and the monthly drawings are the attempts to make it happen.
We need your help to keep this running, which amounts to only $1 a month to make someone's day. In the long term, that’s $120 every decade, which is much more affordable than other expenses. How does it work? Below, you will find an explanation on entering, rules to keep in mind, the selection, and other important things to note.
How to enter:
  • REQUIRED: Leave only one (1) top level comment in reply to this thread! Replying to other comments will not count. It is highly recommended to comment "RemindMe! 3 days Donation for /millionairemakers", which will remind you via PM to donate. That's it!
Important Rules:
  • Only ONE top level comment per person (replies and subsequent-level comments aren't included), but feel free to reply to other comments. Making duplicate top level comments may result in exclusion from entering. Go to me to ensure you don't accidentally double comment.
  • If, by any chance, you do double comment, delete any extra duplicates ASAP, ideally before the thread is locked, as any chosen draws found to violate this will not be eligible to win, and will be banned from the subreddit.
  • Your account must be older than 30 days with some amount of activity. Throwaway accounts with very minimal activity will also not be eligible. This is to prevent multiple entries from the same person.
How will the winner be picked and how can you donate?
  • After 24 hours, this thread will close, and the method of selection will begin.
  • While attempts to make the selection method similar to 2017’s have been performed, it still varies from the original. For an example from a prior drawing, see [Draw #36]. For archival purposes, please click here for the original selection method.
  • Method's TL;DR: Your number is assigned by sorting the comments by old, resulting in the first commenter being 1. The list of comments will be publicly released for the community to verify per their own accord. The subreddit then waits for a randomly generated block (a string of numbers) from Bitcoin's blockchain, after a preselected date and time, and calculates the winner using a formula described in the posts mentioned above.
  • Comment IDs are downloaded at 2:00 UTC, three hours following the thread being locked. There will be an official run at the time listed. If it is shown that there are any technical difficulties, the retrieval of the comments will be delayed by an hour, following the same procedures.
  • While not necessary, to determine if you are on the list, please go to your comment and save it. The comment ID is what gets recorded and selected, which looks like this: e3yxpj4.
  • The Draw is held at 16:00 UTC the Sunday after comments have been downloaded, unless stated otherwise. Using the Bitcoin blockchain, the third block yet to be mined will be used to select a winner.
  • The user who created the winning comment will be informed of their luck and will provide any information necessary for their chosen payment methods (mods will help set this up if needed).
  • The generous Reddit community donates to this lucky person, hopefully making some worthy soul a millionaire! A donation table will be stickied to the winner’s post, giving users the freedom in how they donate.
  • The lucky Redditor follows up with a thank you within the next days, revealing to the community exactly how much was raised and thanking their generosity.
Reminders
  • Take the time you have available now to setup your PayPal, Square Cash, and Google Wallet account, and/or cryptocurrency wallets. (Note: Some services may not be available depending on where you reside.)
  • To buy any cryptocurrencies, you may use Coinbase for purchases using your bank account.
  • To store cryptocurrencies, there are many accessible wallets, and if you win, you will be guided on which ones to download. For Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash, it’s recommended to use the Electrum and Electron Cash wallet for Mac, Linux, and PC.
  • Please try your best to donate a $1, no matter who wins. Every single dollar, cent, anything really counts, so please take the effort to remember and go through with it.
  • If you want to be reminded to donate, please comment "RemindMe! 3 days Donation for /millionairemakers".
  • Spread the word! The more people who participate, the better this gets for everyone! There has been a correlation between this subreddit making it in /all and an increase in donations.
  • Try to cross-post to relevant subs, and upvote. There is a correlation between reaching /all and the amount of donations for the winner. (Please don't spam other subs though. We're not trying to make any enemies here.)
  • If you are under 18, please talk to your parents to get their consent to participate and use their help to setup a PayPal account.
MOST IMPORTANTLY
Remember, this is about generosity, making history, and coming together to make someone's life better. It takes three minutes to donate a bit to the winner, whether you're well off and want to donate a couple bucks, or going through tough times and can only donate a few pennies. Every cent counts.
Note about legality: This is NOT a lottery. You don't have to pay to enter. No prizes are given away directly by the moderators of this subreddit (the moderators will never even touch your donations; this is done voluntarily). As for gift taxes, according to the IRS, they're paid by the donor, and any donations under $15,000 is not taxable.
If a lone $1 can get you seeds (I'm running out of ideas), imagine the possibilities with $1,000,000. You can rake, bake, or skate freely (there aren't many stand-out features in March)!
One million dollars can help give relief to some debts. Spread the word: have your friends and family comment, post the link to your friendly-neighborhood social media network, and share it to anyone interested.
Let's spring up/grow a millionaire!
Pollen has fallen.
Here comes a sneeze and a wheeze.
The winner's calling.
Edits are for reclarification and updates.
submitted by lilfruini to millionairemakers [link] [comments]

some days I hate existing (life situation vent)

sorry if this is a downer post, but I literally had to find and join this sub-reddit just to be able to get some shit off my chest from today and life as a whole right at the moment... thank you for having this Reddit exist, first and foremost, because life sucks for me lately, in general, and for a good number of years, and I am having one hell of a bad day and just need to get this shit off my chest before I have a meltdown. so thank you for whomever created this sub-reddit.

anywho... hey, how's it going, my name is Mike IRL, but I just go by the name High Voltage online, I am a furry, and to use a short and to the point name everyone calls me anymore, I'm just gonna say Hey, I'm volt.

anyways... I'm an autistic furry, I love life...usually...but as of these last handful of years, life has just been one hell of a suck fest. I am a computer geek, self taught, by nature, passion, and habit, I love technology, but the more I learn, the more I realize Murphy is a vindictive bitch. Murphy in this case is Murphy's law, and me and that little shithead have a love hate relationship... I love technology, he loves to make technology hate my guts, and the more I learn about shit, the more I can tell just how much shit goes wrong in ways that are uncommon for me, and for general life. I have friends in the tech industry, that all unanimously agree, and I quote them all here "how the FUCK do you have so many things go wrong?!" this includes a friend who works for dell as a storage expert, a friend that's a tech support call center representative, and a plethora more friends that are just over all tech heads. one point I need to get off my chest.

another thing, is that for the life of me, for the last 10 years since graduation from high school, nothing I do is allowing me to get my ass in a tech job, no amount of experience personally taught, no amount of tech certifications make any difference, nothings helping and I've had to jump from one dead end job to another, just to be able to even afford to survive, and hell, that's a joke in and of itself, cause I cant even afford to be alive, and live, I am barely scraping by, ever, and am forced to live with my parents because I cant even afford subsidized housing, section 8 or otherwise.

per my autism and other issues, I have to take prescriptions just to function in society, which on their own, cost more than I have ever made in a month at any job I've ever had to date, given they are around 8k a month without insurance.

on the comment of insurance, I have to use medicaid/medicare just to be able to afford to be alive, which in turn makes me have an income limit per month, so I cant ever make more than about 1 thousand dollars in a month, making my whopping glorious yearly income, four thousand dollars a year less than poverty, which is classified here in my state as 16 thousand dollars a year.

usually this does not bother me and I'm able to maintain a fairly positive outlook on life, plus or minus my usual depression...and I don't usually let things bug me, and have made in my opinion, a name for myself as being generous, and donating money whenever I'm able to to those less fortunate than myself, countless times I've helped keep friends of mine online whom I have never actually met, and hold credible for being in the situations they claim to be at face value because I trust people and I'm a compassionate person... I have been told so many times by my parents that I'm too trusting, that I have literally lost count...

I have even been scolded by my father once for, and I quote, "your not an entrepreneur, strive for mediocrity!" while a friend of mine was at my house in the basement waiting on me, when my father found out, while I still had my income cap, BEFORE government regulations happened, regulating bitcoin as a taxable asset (I have since gotten out of the bitcoin game for a few years now and it served its purpose while it lasted)

but all of these things are normally manageable on their own in stride.... the thing that's finally just caused me to have enough at this point is the fact that I just realized how truly shitty my current discovery is right now....

more on that one in a moment however...

the one thing that I have always been proud of is this, the fact that I am self taught for all of my computer experience that I have amassed to date, including but not limited to having to be resourceful on finding good deals, given that I found and paid for myself on my measly income, all of the servers that I have to date at my ownership, all found through scrounging for deals, on Facebook marketplace, and driving literally half the entire state of Ohio one way trip to find a deal for a thing I'm after, I have HAD to be resourceful for everything, because I had nothing for income... this includes having to plan and build my own data server using second hand parts, whenever possible, and I have not had any regrets on that, because it has allowed me to get still working systems for damn good prices... so I have never, until today, regretted that... because it has always been mine, built with pride, pride that I found good deals on things, that still worked, and still had usefulness to someone (me) and gave these devices a second lease on life, for good prices, and it was something I did myself, through sheer determination, patience (something I severely lack, and the entire reason I fish for catfish when me and my folks go fishing), and resourcefulness.

welp....honestly, at this point, I don't know what the hell to do now, because out of all of the drives that I have tested so far that this thing uses, after having lost unimaginable quantities of priceless memories that I can never get back, thousands and thousands of dollars in software I cant get back (one of many failures of the storage server, and mistakenly purged gmail emails, leaving zero traces of the software and no ability to discover what it was to try and recover it anymore) and numerous personal memories in the ways of family photos lost among so much more...

of all the drives in this system, over half of them now are saying they are IMMINENT failure, and all of them, every single one of them, is either pre-fail or old age, and given that I have always HAD to buy second hand used and abused storage off of ebay, its no surprise that this has become the case.....normally I'd say "oh well, sucks, gonna have to save up and buy new drive replacements again" in the form of more used drives.....but now, the icing on the cake here, and why I'm at my point of typing up this entire post? I am one of the people that lost their jobs due to this whole pandemic....so....I literally have no way what so ever, to even try and replace these drives...and now I am left with an empty feeling in the pit of my stomach, and an epic oncoming depression fit.

bonus fun points to the fact that I do my damnedest to never ask for funding help for anything in my life ever, given that its the mindset of "my projects, my fun times, my money, nobody else should /HAVE/ to help me given this is MY fun stuff" and the few times I ever ask anyone for help, everyone always jumps down my throat, friends wise, saying how greedy I am as a person to ever ask for funding help for MY stuff, and "what will I get out of it? nothing? then why the fuck should I want to help YOU if I don't get anything from it?" so I always tend to not WANT to ask for help, EVER, given this is how I get treated when I do, and then the few times that I genuinely feel like I need to, after always having that mindset of being a burden to the world, and a nuisance to my friends, when I finally get up the nerve to fucking do so and make a gofundme out of sheer necessity...out of all of the times I have done so, over the years, I literally can count on one single hand, the number of times anybody has ACTUALLY helped me....and I get it, it does not effect them at all, and its their money, trust me I get it, but when I DO actually need help, I never get it... this is one of those times I need help...and I wont get it, and I truly understand that, especially now with this pandemic and so many people being out of their jobs and or scared of losing their jobs, I understand that, I wouldn't be able to now even if I wanted to anyways, but it just fucking sucks... always going so far out of my way to help others when I'm able to, and then life always being such a fucking bitch like this to me.

*sighs heavily* anyways....sorry for the vent, but I fucking needed to bitch and moan somewhat today...god knows I've been forced to try and bottle it up for far too fucking long, because everyone's been tired of my bitching, even though I tend to only do so, to enough of a degree to keep my head afloat as needed.

just for shits and giggles, I'll post a link to the hard drive reports, just to share what I am forced to work with because its all I can afford...not that I have any problems with it mind you, if it works, and I can afford it, then that's what I'll take any fucking day of the week, given its a means to an end.
https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1gK7EGCU9fX9lcC1G4to2ZwbvNA8cBVQM?usp=sharing
anyways...as usual, I've made my gofundme, and as usual, I know what to expect...nothing...but whatever. such is life.
submitted by mapmd1234 to Vent [link] [comments]

Crypto-Currency: A Guide to Common Tax Situations

STATUS: Majority of questions have been answered. If yours got missed, please feel free to post it again.
Introduction
All,
Based on the rapid increase in popularity and price of bitcoin and other crypto currencies (particularly over the past year), I expect that lots of people have questions about how crypto currency will impact their taxes. This thread attempts to address several common issues. I'm posting similar versions of it here, in several major crypto subs, and eventually in the weekly "tax help" threads personalfinance runs.
I'd like to thank the /personalfinance mod team and the /tax community for their help with this thread and especially for reading earlier versions and offering several valuable suggestions/corrections.
This thread is NOT an endorsement of crypto currency as an investing strategy. There is a time and a place to debate the appropriateness of crypto as part of a diversified portfolio - but that time is not now and that place is not here. If you are interested in the general consensus of this sub on investing, I would urge you to consult the wiki while keeping in mind the general flowchart outlining basic steps to get your finances in order.
Finally, please note that this thread attempts to provide information about your tax obligations as defined by United States law (and interpreted by the IRS under the direction of the Treasury Department). I understand that a certain portion of the crypto community tends to view crypto as "tax free" due to the (actual and perceived) difficulty for the IRS to "know" about the transactions involved. I will not discuss unlawfully concealing crypto gains here nor will I suggest illegal tax avoidance activities.
The Basics
This section is best for people that don't understand much about taxes. It covers some very basic tax principles. It also assumes that all you did during the year was buy/sell a single crypto currency.
Fundamentally, the IRS treats crypto not as money, but as an asset (investment). While there are a few specific "twists" when it comes to crypto, when in doubt replace the word "crypto" with the word "stock" and you will get a pretty good idea how you should report and pay tax on crypto.
The first thing you should know is that the majority of this discussion applies to the taxes you are currently working on (2017 taxes). The tax bill that just passed applies to 2018 taxes (with a few very tiny exceptions), which most people will file in early 2019.
In general, you don't have to report or pay taxes on crypto currency holdings until you "cash out" all or part of your holdings. For now, I'm going to assume that you cash out by selling them for USD; however, other forms of cashing out will be covered later.
When you sell crypto, you report the difference between your basis (purchase price) and proceeds (sale price) on Schedule D. Your purchase price is commonly referred to as your basis; while the two terms don't mean exactly the same thing, they are pretty close to one another (in particular, there are three two ways to calculate your basis - your average cost, a first-in, first-out method, and a "specific identification" method. See more about these here and here). EDIT - you may not use average cost method with crypto - see here. If you sell at a gain, this gain increases your tax liability; if you sell at a loss, this loss decreases your tax liability (in most cases). If you sell multiple times during the year, you report each transaction separately (bad news if you trade often) but get to lump all your gains/losses together when determining how the trades impact your income.
One important thing to remember is that there are two different types of gains/losses from investments - short term gains (if you held an asset for one year or less) and long term gains (over one year; i.e. one year and one day). Short term gains are taxed at your marginal income rate (basically, just like if you had earned that money at a job) while long term gains are taxed at lower rates.
For most people, long term capital gains are taxed at 15%. However, if you are in the 10% or 15% tax bracket, congrats - your gains (up to the maximum amount of "unused space" in your bracket) are tax free! If you are in the 25%, 28%, 33%, or 35% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 15%. If you are in the 39.6% bracket, long term gains are taxed at 20%. Additionally, there is an "extra" 3.8% tax that applies to gains for those above $200,000/$250,000 (single/married). The exact computation of this tax is a little complicated, but if you are close to the $200,000 level, just know that it exists.
Finally, you should know that I'm assuming that you should treat your crypto gains/losses as investment gains/losses. I'm sure some people will try and argue that they are really "day traders" of crypto and trade as a full time job. While this is possible, the vast majority of people don't qualify for this status and you should really think several times before deciding you want to try that approach on the IRS.
"Cashing Out" - Trading Crypto for Goods/Services
I realize that not everyone that "cashes out" of crypto does so by selling it for USD. In fact, I understand that some in the crypto community view the necessity of cashing out itself as a type of myth. In this section, I discuss what happens if you trade your crypto for basically anything that isn't cash (minor sidenote - see next section for a special discussion on trading crypto for crypto; i.e. buying altcoins with crypto).
The IRS views trading crypto for something of value as a type of bartering that must be included in income. From the IRS's perspective, it doesn't matter if you sold crypto for cash and bought a car with that cash or if you just traded crypto directly for the car - in both cases, the IRS views you as having sold your crypto. This approach isn't unique to crypto - it works the same way if you trade stock for something.
This means that if you do trade your crypto for "stuff", you have to report every exchange as a sale of your crypto and calculate the gain/loss on that sale, just as if you had sold the crypto for cash.
Finally, there is one important exception to this rule. If you give your crypto away to charity (one recognized by the IRS; like a 501(c)(3) organization), the IRS doesn't make you report/pay any capital gains on the transaction. Additionally, you still get to deduct the value of your donation on the date it was made. Now, from a "selfish" point of view, you will always end up with more money if you sell the crypto, pay the tax, and keep the rest. But, if you are going to make a donation anyway, especially a large one, giving crypto where you have a big unrealized/untaxed gain is a very efficient way of doing so.
"Alt Coins" - Buying Crypto with Crypto
The previous section discusses what happens when you trade crypto for stuff. However, one thing that surprises many people is that trading crypto for crypto is also a taxable event, just like trading crypto for a car. Whether you agree with this position or not, it makes a lot of sense once you realize that the IRS doesn't view crypto as money, but instead as an asset. So to the IRS, trading bitcoin for ripple isn't like trading dollars for euros, but it is instead like trading shares of Apple stock for shares of Tesla stock.
Practically, what this means is that if you trade one crypto for another crypto (say BTC for XRP just to illustrate the point), the IRS views you as doing the following:
  • Selling for cash the amount of BTC you actually traded for XRP.
  • Owing capital gains/losses on the BTC based on its selling price (the fair market value at the moment of the exchange) and your purchase price (basis).
  • Buying a new investment (XRP) with a cost basis equal to the amount the BTC was worth when you exchanged them.
This means that if you "time" your trade wrong and the value of XRP goes down after you make the exchange, you still owe tax on your BTC gain even though you subsequently lost money. The one good piece of news in this is that when/if you sell your XRP (or change it back to BTC), you will get a capital loss for the value that XRP dropped.
There is one final point worth discussing in this section - the so called "like kind exchange" rules (aka section 1031 exchange). At a high level, these rules say that you can "swap" property with someone else without having to pay taxes on the exchange as long as you get property in return that is "like kind". Typically, these rules are used in real estate transactions. However, they can also apply to other types of transactions as well.
While the idea is simple (and makes it sound like crypto for crypto should qualify), the exact rules/details of this exception are very fact specific. Most experts (including myself, but certainly not calling myself an expert) believe that a crypto for crypto swap is not a like kind exchange. The recently passed tax bill also explicitly clarifies this issue - starting in 2018, only real estate qualifies for like kind exchange treatment. So, basically, the vast majority of evidence suggests that you can't use this "loophole" for 2017; however, there is a small minority view/some small amount of belief that this treatment would work for 2017 taxes and it is worth noting that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this approach.
Dealing with "Forks"
Perhaps another unpleasant surprise for crypto holders is that "forks" to create a new crypto also very likely generate a taxable event. The IRS has long (since at least the 1960s) held that "found" money is a taxable event. This approach has been litigated in court and courts have consistently upheld this position; it even has its own cool nerdy tax name - the "treasure trove" doctrine.
Practically, what this means is that if you owned BTC and it "forked" to create BCH, then the fair market value of the BCH you received is considered a "treasure trove" that must be reported as income (ordinary income - no capital gain rates). This is true whether or not you sold your BCH; if you got BCH from a fork, that is a taxable event (note - I'll continue using BTC forking to BCH in this section as an example, but the logic applies to all forks).
While everything I've discussed up to this point is pretty clearly established tax law, forks are really where things get messy with taxes. Thus, the remainder of this section contains more speculation than elsewhere in this post - the truth is that while the idea is simple (fork = free money = taxable), the details are messy and other kinds of tax treatment might apply to forks.
One basic practical problem with forks is that the new currency doesn't necessarily start trading immediately. Thus, you may have received BCH before there was a clear price or market for it. Basically, you owe tax on the value of BCH when you received it, but it isn't completely clear what that value was. There are several ways you can handle this; I'll list them in order from most accurate to least accurate (but note that this is just my personal view and there is ongoing disagreement on this issue with little/no authoritative guidance).
  • Use a futures market to determine the value of the BCH - if reliable sources published realistic estimates of what BCH will trade for in the future once trading begins, use this estimate as the value of your BCH. Pros/cons - futures markets are, in theory, pretty accurate. However, if they are volatile/subject to manipulation, they may provide an incorrect estimate of the true value of BCH. It would suck to use the first futures value published only to have that value plummet shortly thereafter, leaving you to pay ordinary income tax but only have an unrealized capital loss.
  • Wait until an exchange starts trading BCH; use the actual ("spot" price) as the value. Pros/cons - spot prices certainly reflect what you could have sold BCH for; however, it is possible that the true value of the coin was highelower when you received it as compared to when it started trading on the exchange. Thus this method seems less accurate to me than a futures based approach, but it is still certainly fairly reasonable.
  • Assume that the value is $0. This is my least preferred option, but there is still a case to be made for it. If you receive something that you didn't want, can't access, can't sell, and might fail, does it have any value? I believe the answer is yes (maybe not value it perfectly, but value it somewhat accurately), but if you honestly think the answer is no, then the correct tax answer would be to report $0 in income from the fork. The IRS would be most likely to disagree with this approach, especially since it results in the least amount of income reported for the current year (and the most favorable rates going forward). Accordingly, if you go this route, make extra sure you understand what it entails.
Note, once you've decided what to report as taxable income, this amount also becomes your cost basis in the new crypto (BCH). Thus, when you ultimately sell your BCH (or trade it for something else as described above), you calculate your gain/loss based on what you included in taxable income from the fork.
Finally, there is one more approach to dealing with forks worth mentioning. A fork "feels" a lot like a dividend - because you held BTC, you get BCH. In a stock world, if I get a cash dividend because I own the stock, that money is not treated as a "treasure trove" and subject to ordinary income rates - in most cases, it is a qualified dividend and subject to capital gain rates; in some cases, some types of stock dividends are completely non taxable. This article discusses this idea in slightly more detail and generally concludes that forks should not be treated as a dividend. Still, I would note that I'm unaware of any court cases directly testing this theory.
Ultimately, this post is supposed to be practical, so let me make sure to leave you with two key thoughts about the taxation of forks. First, I believe that the majority of evidence suggests that forks should be treated as a "treasure trove" and reported as ordinary income based on their value at creation and that this is certainly the "safest" option. Second, out of everything discussed in this post, I also believe that the correct taxation of forks is the murkiest and most "up for debate" area. If you are interested in a more detailed discussion of forks, see this thread for a previous version of this post discussing it at even more length and the comments for a discussion of this with the tax community.
Mining Crypto
Successfully mining crypto coins is a taxable event. Depending on the amount of effort you put into mining, it is either considered a hobby or a self-employment (business) activity. The IRS provides the following list of questions to help decide the correct classification:
  • The manner in which the taxpayer carries on the activity.
  • The expertise of the taxpayer or his advisors.
  • The time and effort expended by the taxpayer in carrying on the activity.
  • Expectation that assets used in activity may appreciate in value.
  • The success of the taxpayer in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities.
  • The taxpayer’s history of income or losses with respect to the activity.
  • The amount of occasional profits, if any, which are earned.
If this still sounds complicated, that's because the distinction is subject to some amount of interpretation. As a rule of thumb, randomly mining crypto on an old computer is probably a hobby; mining full time on a custom rig is probably a business.
In either event, you must include in income the fair market value of any coins you successfully mine. These are ordinary income and your basis in these coins is their fair market value on the date they were mined. If your mining is a hobby, they go on line 21 (other income) and any expenses directly associated with mining go on schedule A (miscellaneous subject to 2% of AGI limitation). If your mining is a business, income and expenses go on schedule C.
Both approaches have pros and cons - hobby income isn't subject to the 15.3% self-employment tax, only normal income tax, but you get fewer deductions against your income and the deductions you get are less valuable. Business income has more deductions available, but you have to pay payroll (self-employment) tax of about 15.3% in addition to normal income tax.
What if I didn't keep good records? Do I really have to report every transaction?
One nice thing about the IRS treating crypto as an asset is that we can look at how the IRS treats people that "day trade" stock and often don't keep great records/have lots of transactions. While you need to be as accurate as possible, it is ok to estimate a little bit if you don't have exact records (especially concerning your cost basis). You need to put in some effort (research historical prices, etc...) and be reasonable, but the IRS would much rather you do a little bit of reasonable estimation as opposed to just not reporting anything. Sure, they might decide to audit you/disagree with some specifics, but you earn yourself a lot of credit if you can show that you honestly did the best you reasonably could and are making efforts to improve going forward.
However, concerning reporting every transaction - yes, sorry, it is clear that you have to do this, even if you made hundreds or thousands of them. Stock traders have had to go through this for many decades, and there is absolutely no reason to believe that the IRS would accept anything less from the crypto community. If you have the records or have any reasonable way of obtaining records/estimating them, you must report every transaction.
What if I don't trust you?
Well, first let me say that I can't believe you made it all the way down here to this section. Thanks for giving me an honest hearing. I would strongly encourage you to go read other well-written, honest guides. I'll link to some I like (both more technical IRS type guides and more crypto community driven guides). While a certain portion of the crypto community seems to view one of the benefits of crypto as avoiding all government regulation (including taxes), I've been pleasantly surprised to find that many crypto forums contain well reasoned, accurate tax guides. While I may not agree with 100% of their conclusions, that likely reflects true uncertainty around tax law that is fundamentally complex rather than an attempt on either end to help individuals unlawfully avoid taxes.
IRS guides
Non-IRS guides
submitted by Mrme487 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

Analyzing the new 2019 Crypto Tax Guidelines (Podcast & Summary)

Hey all - I typically post my podcast episodes on our personal subreddit, and on this subreddit. Here's my interview with Tyson Cross. Disclaimer, I work for BitcoinTaxes. The summary is a bit longer than usual, but there were a lot of parts that I thought were important to highlight from this episode.
---
The IRS has recently released new tax guidance for cryptocurrency trading – the first official guidance released in over 5 years, since March 2014. Tyson Cross, a tax attorney who specializes in cryptocurrency taxation, joins me on The BitcoinTaxes Podcast to analyze this new guidance.
In addition to analyzing the new guidelines (and Tyson providing his expertise) we answered some questions from Reddit users as well (starting @ 44:50).
Link to the podcast episode page
Link to the podcast audio
Summary/Highlights:
Two Components – Revenue Ruling & FAQ (1:08):
The revenue ruling creates some problems. The FAQ, for the most part, is not too problematic. But – I’d say on the net whole, both maybe create more questions than they answer, unfortunately.

The Revenue Ruling – Airdrops & Forks (2:28):
Revenue Ruling 2019-24 is what the IRS released and specifically it addresses this issue of hard forks and airdrops, which until now has really gone unanswered. There’s been a lot of debate in the tax community about whether hard forks and airdrops are taxable events…whether they satisfy these kinds of requirements that we have from existing law for treating something as a taxable event. The big two are: do you have an ascension to wealth – meaning is the thing you received valuable? Number two, do you have dominion and control over it – meaning are you free to treat it as your own? If those two things are met, then generally speaking, you have taxable income.
The problem is applying those two standards to hard forks or airdrops is actually pretty difficult. The revenue ruling here attempts to make that application – but the problem is that the facts they use are problematic…and don’t seem to really adequately describe a hard fork or an airdrop. This revenue ruling is broken down into two situations where the IRS lays out the facts and then applies the law and reaches a conclusion about whether or not these events are taxable.
They say situation one is not a taxable event because the taxpayer did not receive additional units of virtual currency. But in situation two, the IRS says that it was a taxable event because the taxpayer not only received units of virtual currency from the followup airdrop, but also had dominion and control, because the taxpayer could immediately sell them if he or she wanted to. Situation one is not taxable. Situation two is taxable. So where do most hard forks like the BTC/BCH hard fork fit in? Strictly speaking, if you really took those revenue ruling at face value using the plain language, it doesn’t fit into either one because the BTC/BCH hard fork wasn’t followed by an airdrop.
This revenue ruling, like many issues that have come up with cryptocurrency, puts taxpayers in a really hard spot where they are left yet again guessing what the IRS wants them to do. If you don’t want to have any problems with the IRS in the future, I would tell you to go ahead and report every hard fork and every airdrop as a taxable event.

The IRS FAQ on Virtual Currency Transactions – Specific Identification Methods (22:30):
One of the big questions that’s been floating around the virtual currency space now for years is what methods do you use to calculate your cost basis? FIFO (First In First Out) is the default approach for shares of stock – so, kind of unsurprisingly, the IRS said in the FAQ Question #38 that FIFO is the default method also for virtual currency.
What was maybe a little bit surprising is that the IRS also says in Question #37 that you can use specific identification for virtual currency. This was actually a little surprising to me because the requirements for using specific identification for shares of stock is actually a little burdensome. In Question #37, the IRS sets what I would consider a pretty low bar to use specific identification for cryptocurrency transactions.
Specific identification would mean that instead of just assuming you’re selling your first Bitcoin, the oldest Bitcoin in your wallet, you can actually look at all of your holdings and pick which one you’re selling when you do a sale. So you could pick the one with the highest cost basis if you wanted (HCFO), or you could pick the newest one in your wallet (LIFO). So this opens up a lot of possibilities for taxpayers to be a little more strategic about how their gains are reported. Using specific identification, taxpayers can maybe choose the cost basis method that causes them to have the lowest amount of capital gains.
Most people listening should be relatively happy to hear that specific identification is possible. The question is what do you have to do to be allowed to use it? Question #37 says that you have to have records showing the transaction information for all units of the specific virtual currency held in a single account wallet or address. The question goes on to say that the information must show four things: the date and time each unit was acquired, your cost basis and the fair market value of each unit at the time it was acquired, the time and date each unit was sold or otherwise disposed of, and the fair market value of each unit when it was sold or disposed of. Well those are four things that we pretty much have already, every time we do a transaction with virtual currency – if you trade on coin on a Poloniex, when you download your transaction report, it’s going to show all four of those things every time.

Unchanged Guidelines & Unanswered Questions (29:43):
I would say most things weren’t changed by this guidance. And that’s one of the things that’s maybe a little disappointing about the updated FAQ and the Revenue Ruling. A lot of it we already knew, especially in the FAQ – it kind of just flushes out some of the smaller points. But generally, the basic principles that we’ve been operating under for the last five years are all still in place.
We know that basically any transaction conducted with virtual currency is a taxable event and it’s generally capital gains and reported on Schedule D of your tax return. That part of it is still the same – nothing changed. The FAQ also addresses things like mining. We’ve known for a while that you have ordinary income based on the value of that coin at the time that it is mined. That logic would apply to staking rewards and other similar receipts of virtual currency. Also if you get paid in virtual currency, you know that’s taxable. Whether you’re an employee, or you’re a business selling goods or services, those are all taxable events.
There are still some big unanswered questions that we have and hopefully we get some guidance on that soon. I think the big thing they missed, and it’s really disappointing, was the issue about foreign account reporting.We’ve been asking this question now for five years or longer, about whether accounts held at foreign cryptocurrency exchanges are subject to reporting on FBAR or under FATCA on Form 8938. The question is, does an account at a foreign cryptocurrency exchange fall within the definitions used for the FBAR and Form 8938? And the answer is that we don’t know.

Retroactive Guidelines (34:20):
Most IRS rulings are retroactive unless otherwise stated. The Revenue Ruling and FAQ do not identify an exception to that. So I would say that these are retroactive.
Should you go back and amend past years? That’s a tough question to answer. I’d say talk to your tax preparer or advisor and see what they think. A lot of that depends on how much income it was, how much the rest of your income was on your tax return, how much time is left on the statute of limitations. It’s not an easy question to apply generally. But certainly you should look into it because the IRS will be following this revenue ruling retroactively.

Questions from the Community @ 44:50:
Tyson answers questions from social media, Reddit, and from BitcoinTaxes users.

Important Links:
IRS FAQ
Rev. Rul. 2019-24 (PDF)
BitcoinTaxes Summary
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

US Tax Guide for ETH and other cryptocurrencies

Introduction:  
Greetings, fellow ethtraders! Happy New Year! In the next few months, taxpayers across the US will be filing their 2017 tax returns. As an Enrolled Agent and a ETH/cryptocurrency investor and enthusiast, I wanted to write up a brief guide on how your investments in ETH and other cryptocurrencies are taxed in the US.
 
 
1. Are ETH/cryptocurrency realized gains taxable?
Yes. The IRS treats virtual currency (such as cryptocurrency) as property. That means if you sell ETH, BTC, or any other cryptocurrency that has appreciated in value, you have realized a capital gain and must pay taxes on this income. If you held the position for one year or less, it is a short-term capital gain which is taxed at your ordinary income tax rate. If you held the position for more than one year, it is a long-term capital gain which is taxed at your long-term capital gains tax rate. In most cases, this is 15%, but could also be 0% or 20% depending on your specific ordinary income tax bracket.
 
2. If I sell my ETH for USD on Coinbase but do not transfer the USD from Coinbase to my bank account, am I still taxed?
Yes. The only thing that matters is that you sold the ETH, which creates a taxable transaction. Whether you transfer the USD to your bank account or not does not matter.
 
3. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or another cryptocurrency, is this a taxable transaction?
Most likely yes. See #4 below for a more detailed explanation. If assuming crypto to crypto trades are not able to be like-kind exchanged, then continue on to the next paragraph here.
This is actually two different transactions. The first transaction is selling your ETH for USD. The second transaction is buying the OMG with your USD. You must manually calculate these amounts. For example, I buy 1 ETH for $600 on Coinbase. Later on, the price of 1 ETH rises to $700. I transfer that 1 ETH to Bittrex and use it to buy 37 OMG. I have to report a capital gain of $100 because of this transaction. My total cost basis for the 37 OMG I purchased is $700.
 
4. If I use my ETH to buy OMG or other cryptocurrency, could that be considered a tax-free like-kind exchange?
Probably not. The new tax law says that like-kind exchanges only pertain to real estate transactions. This was done with Section 13303, which replaced “property” with “real property” for all of Section 1031 (page 72 near the bottom). My personal interpretation:
In 2018 and going forward, cryptocurrencies can definitely not be like-kind exchanged.
In 2017 and before, it is a very gray area. I personally am not taking the position that they can be like-kind exchanged, because if the IRS went after a taxpayer who did this, the IRS would probably win and the taxpayer would owe taxes, interest, and probably penalties on every single little gain made from trading one cryptocurrency for another.
Here is a great interpretation of why trading cryptocurrency for cryptocurrency is probably not a like-kind transaction.
In my opinion, the biggest factor is that like-kind exchanges must be reported on Form 8824 and not just ignored. Therefore, if a taxpayer is claiming like-kind exchanges on crypto to crypto exchanges, he or she would have to fill out a Form 8824 for each individual transaction of crypto to crypto, which would be absolutely cumbersome if there are hundreds or thousands of such trades.
Here is another article about like-kind exchanges.
Here is the American Institute of CPAs' letter to the IRS, dated June 10, 2016, asking them to release guidance on whether crypto to crypto can be like-kind exchanged or not. The IRS has not responded to the letter.
 
5. How do I calculate the realized capital gain or loss on the sale of my cryptocurrency?
The realized gain or loss is your total proceeds from the sale minus what you purchased those positions for (your cost basis). For example, you bought 1 ETH for $300 in June of 2017. In December of 2017, you sold that 1 ETH for $800. Your realized gain would be $800 - $300 = $500. Since you held it for one year or less, the $500 would be a short-term capital gain taxed at your ordinary income tax rate.
 
6. Which ETH's cost basis do I use if I have multiple purchases?
The cost basis reporting method is up to you. For example, I buy my first ETH at $300, a second ETH at $530, and a third ETH at $400. Later on, I sell one ETH for $800. I can use:
FIFO (first in first out) - cost basis would the first ETH, $300, which would result in a gain of $500.
LIFO (last in first out) - cost basis would be the third ETH, $400, which would result in a gain of $400.
Average cost - cost basis would be the average of the three ETH, $410, which would result in a gain of $390.
Specific identification - I can just choose which coin's cost basis to use. For example, I can choose the second ETH's cost basis, $530, which would result in the lowest capital gains possible of $270.
 
7. If I end up with a net capital loss, can I claim this on my tax return?
Capital gains and capital losses are netted on your tax return. If the net result of this is a capital loss, you may offset it against ordinary income on your tax return, but only at a maximum of $3,000 per year. The remaining losses are carried forward until you use them up.
 
8. What is the tax rate on my capital gains?
If long-term, the tax rate is 0%, 15%, or 20%, depending on your ordinary income tax bracket. If short-term, the tax bracket you’ll be in will depend on your total income and deductions. The ordinary income tax brackets are 10%, 15%, 25%, 28%, 33%, 35%, and 39.6% in 2017 and 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35%, and 37% in 2018 and going forward.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 ordinary income tax brackets.
Here are the 2017 and 2018 long-term capital gains tax brackets.
Here is a detailed article on how the calculation of long-term capital gains tax work and how you can take advantage of the 0% long-term capital gains rate, if applicable.
 
9. If I mine ETH or any other cryptocurrency, is this taxable?
Yes. IRS Notice 2014-21 states that mining cryptocurrency is taxable. For example, if you mined $7,000 worth of ETH in 2017, you must report $7,000 of income on your 2017 tax return. For many taxpayers, this will be reported on your Schedule C, and you will most likely owe self-employment taxes on this income as well. The $7,000 becomes the cost basis in your ETH position.
 
10. How do I calculate income for the cryptocurrency I mined?
This is the approach I would take. Say I mined 1 ETH on December 31, 2017. I would look up the daily historical prices for ETH and average the high and low prices for ETH on December 31, 2017, which is ($760.35 + $710.12) / 2 = $735.24. I would report $735.24 of income on my tax return. This would also be the cost basis of the 1 ETH I mined.
 
11. Can I deduct mining expenses on my tax return?
If you are reporting the income from mining on Schedule C, then you can deduct expenses on Schedule C as well. You can deduct the portion of your electricity costs allocated to mining, and then you depreciate the cost of your mining rig over time (probably over five years). Section 179 also allows for the full deduction of the cost of certain equipment in year 1, so you could choose to do that if you wanted to instead.
 
12. If I receive ETH or other cryptocurrency as a payment for my business, is this taxable?
Yes. Similar to mining, your income would be what the value of the coins you received was. This would also be your cost basis in the coins.
 
13. If I received Bitcoin Cash as a result of the hard fork on August 1, 2017, is this taxable?
Most likely yes. For example, if you owned 1 Bitcoin and received 1 Bitcoin Cash on August 1, 2017 as a result of the hard fork, your income would be the value of 1 Bitcoin Cash on that date. Bitcoin.tax uses a value of $277. This value would also be your cost basis in the position. Any other hard forks would probably be treated similarly. Airdrops may be treated similarly as well, in the IRS' view.
Here are a couple more good articles about reporting the Bitcoin Cash fork as taxable ordinary income. The second one goes into depth and cites a US Supreme Court decision as precedent: one, two
 
14. If I use ETH, BTC, or other cryptocurrency to purchase goods or services, is this a taxable transaction?
Yes. It would be treated as selling your cryptocurrency for USD, and then using that USD to purchase those goods or services. This is because the IRS treats cryptocurrency as property and not currency.
 
15. Are cryptocurrencies subject to the wash sale rule?
Probably not. Section 1091 only applies to stock or securities. Cryptocurrencies are not classified as stocks or securities. Therefore, you could sell your ETH at a loss, repurchase it immediately, and still realize this loss on your tax return, whereas you cannot do the same with a stock. Please see this link for more information.
 
16. What if I hold cryptocurrency on an exchange based outside of the US?
There are two separate foreign account reporting requirements: FBAR and FATCA.
A FBAR must be filed if you held more than $10,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year.
A Form 8938 (FATCA) must be filed if you held more than $75,000 on an exchange based outside of the US at any point during the tax year, or more than $50,000 on the last day of the tax year.
The penalties are severe for not filing these two forms if you are required to. Please see the second half of this post for more information on foreign account reporting.
 
17. What are the tax implications of gifting cryptocurrency?
Small gifts of cryptocurrency do not have a tax implication for the gift giver or for the recipient. The recipient would retain the gift giver's old cost basis, so it could be a good idea for the gift giver to provide records of the original cost basis to the recipient as well (or else the recipient would have to assume a cost basis of $0 if the recipient ever sells the cryptocurrency).
Large gifts of cryptocurrency could start having gift and estate tax implications on the giver if the value exceeds more than $14,000 (in 2017) or $15,000 (in 2018) per year per recipient.
Here's a good article on Investopedia on this issue.
An important exception applies if the gift giver gives cryptocurrency that has a cost basis that is higher than the market value at the time of the gift. Please see the middle of this post for more information on that.
 
18. Where can I learn even more about cryptocurrency taxation?
Unchained Podcast: The Tax Rules That Have Crypto Users Aghast
IRS Notice 2014-21
Great reddit post from tax attorney Tyson Cross from 2014
 
19. Are there any websites that you recommend in helping me with all of this?
Yes - I have used bitcoin.tax and highly recommend it. You can import directly from an exchange to the website using API, and/or export a .csv/excel file from the exchange and import it into the website. The exchanges I successfully imported from were Coinbase, GDAX, Bittrex, and Binance. The result is a .csv or other file that you can import into your tax software.
I have also heard good things about cointracking.info but have not personally used it myself.
 
20. Taxation is theft!
I can't help you there.
 
 
That is the summary I have for now. There have been a lot of excellent cryptocurrency tax guides on reddit, such as this one, this one, and this one, but I wanted to post my short summary guide on ethtrader which hopefully answers some of the questions you all may have about US taxation of ETH and other cryptocurrencies. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and I’d be happy to answer them to the best of my ability. Thank you!
Regarding edits: I have made many edits to my post since I originally posted it. Please refresh to see the latest edits to my guide. Thank you.
 
Disclaimer:
The information contained within this post is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining tax, accounting, or financial advice from a professional.
Any U.S. federal tax advice contained in this post is not intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding penalties under U.S. federal tax law.
Presentation of the information via the Internet is not intended to create, and receipt does not constitute, an advisor-client relationship. Internet users are advised not to act upon this information without seeking the service of a tax professional.
submitted by Nubboi to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Ten things to know about crypto taxation.

The IRS opened their e-filing on January 28th and many people are now filing their taxes.
While the new tax laws have changed a few things this year, most rules regarding cryptocurrencies have remained the same.
If you are new to including cryptocurrency in your tax returns, or just could do with a refresher, here are 10 useful pieces of information.

1. Profits from cryptocurrencies are capital gains

A tax event occurs whenever you dispose of any cryptocurrency. For each event, you have to calculate if you made or lost any money. These are declared as capital gains/losses (Schedule D) on your tax forms.
This includes:
If you didn't receive a dollar amount, such as when selling for USD, then you would use the fair market value of the crypto at the time. This might be how much it was worth, or the value of the item you are acquiring. For example, if you buy a $100 gift card, then the fair market value of the BTC you are spending is $100.
It also doesn't matter if you traded and never withdrew the USD to your bank, or received crypto to your own wallet. If the account is under your control and you would have access to the received funds, then it needs to be declared. It also doesn't matter if it is a US or foreign exchange. For US taxpayers, all activity must be included.

2. Long-term gains have discounted tax rates

If you sell or spend your crypto that was owned for more than a year, it can be classed as long-term and any gains made will have discounted tax rates. The rate depends on your other income, but can be 15% or even 0% for lower income taxpayers. There is a 20% rate for high income earners.
You will need to keep records in case you are even asked to prove you owned them for longer than a year.

3. Losses can be offset against income to reduce taxes

To calculate your total capital gains, your short-term gains and losses are combined. Then any long-term gains and losses are combined. Finally, these totals are combined into a net gain or loss.
If you have a net loss, you can use it to deduct up to $3,000 against your normal taxable income, for example, saving $720 in taxes with a 24% tax rate.
Any remaining losses are carried forward to next year. They can again be used to reduce capital gains from that year as well as another $3,000 against income. This continues forever until you have used up all the losses.

4. Like-kind exchanges

Trading between cryptocurrencies is a tax event and you cannot use a 1031 like-kind exchange.
The new tax law in 2018 has changed the wording to:
No gain or loss shall be recognized on the exchange of real property held for productive use in a trade or business or for investment if such real property is exchanged solely for real property of like kind which is to be held either for productive use in a trade or business or for investment.
While some people reported using like-kind exchanges for 2017 and earlier, it definitely cannot be used for this tax year and onward.

5. Record forks, splits and airdrops

Any crypto you receive is treated as income on the day it was received. The dollar value is its fair price or market value.
While some crypto may have an established price, often, there is no market or known price. In this case, you should still add the crypto as Income, but for zero value.
This is needed for when they are eventually sold or traded, as you will use the date and amount from when they were acquired to work out the appropriate gains.

6. Being paid in cryptocurrency should be reported as if you received dollars

If you are paid with crypto, you should report the income as if you were paid in dollars. If you were paid by an employer, it is likely the figures have already been included in your W2 and there is nothing else you need to do.
But if you received crypto from self-employed, or other work, then you need to report the fair value as your income. For example, if you did some work that you would normally have been paid $1,000, but instead you received crypto, then you report $1,000 as income in your taxes. If you just received some crypto with no equivalent dollar value, then you must use the fair or market price of those crypto on the day you received them.

7. Tips/gifts aren't taxable

If you were tipped, as long as it was not for any provided product or service (i.e. you didn't earn it), then it is gift and does not need to reported and is not due income taxes.
However, if you were tipped or gifted crypto that you subsequently sell or trade, you will incur capital gains.
If you were given the cost basis along with those gifts, you can use this information to reduce any gains when you come to sell them. However, you cannot take losses from the basis of these coins, but instead have to use the market value on the date you received the gift.

8. Transfers do not have to be reported (but fees might)

When you transfer any crypto between various wallets or exchange accounts that you own, you do not need to report or pay any tax on those amounts.
However, you might need to report any fees associated with the transfer, either mining or withdrawal fees. These are disposals, where you are paying for a service, and so should be included as Spending even though the tax amount is likely negligible.
If you were transferring your crypto to an exchange to sell, you could add this to its basis, or deduct it from the proceeds you receive.
Any fees included for spending from a wallet should be included as part of the fair market value. For example, if you are spending 0.01 BTC on something worth $36 but have to include a mining 0.001 fee, you should record this as spending 0.011 BTC for $36.

9. Identify lost, stolen or fraudulent activity

Prior to 2018, stolen property could be claimed as a deduction by reporting it as a casualty loss (subject to certain amounts). This deduction has been removed and now is only available for presidential declared disasters.
While lost crypto could never have been claimed, as accidents or negligence are not tax deduction, losing crypto because of fraudulent activity could instead be seen as a capital loss. For example, if the crypto had become worthless or you are no longer able to access it.
Each situation is different and you should check with your tax professional to decide how to report any lost crypto due to fraudulent activity.

10. Keep records

You should keep records of all your crypto activity in case you are ever audited or required to show documentation relating to your tax returns. For example, you might be required to prove the long-term gains you declared were owned for more than a year.
The burden is always on you to keep documentation and perform record-keeping.
Recently, we have seen exchanges go offline and users have no access to their historical records, or even funds. You should access your accounts and download your data as frequently as needed.
This post is for informational purposes only and not intended as tax or financial advice. Please speak with your own tax professional on how you should treat the taxation of your own cryptocurrencies given you own circumstances. Disclaimer: I am a part of the bitcoin.tax team - a cryptocurrency capital gains calculation service.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to BitcoinMarkets [link] [comments]

Crypto Taxation in New Zealand (Podcast + Brief Guide)

Hey all - recently did a podcast where I interviewed Tim Doyle, who is a chartered accountant in New Zealand that specializes in crypto. He talked about how crypto is taxed in New Zealand, and provided some really solid information. In addition, one of my co-workers wrote up a brief guide to crypto taxation in NZ. I thought this would be a relevant place to post (and he mentioned this subreddit in our interview).
Full disclosure: I work for BitcoinTaxes, which is the company this podcast is a part of.
Here's a link to the page, with the podcast audio (and guide): https://talk.bitcoin.tax/tim-doyle-new-zealand-crypto-taxation/
Here's a link to the audio itself: https://dyk972he7tjqu.cloudfront.net/crypto-tax-new-zealand-tim-doyle.mp3
Here's the brief guide text:
With the increased popularity of cryptocurrency, countries have begun to create tax laws specifically targeted at crypto transactions. New Zealand has followed suit and has aligned with many other countries’ suggestions for taxing crypto, including the characterization of cryptocurrency and what constitutes a taxable event. New Zealand is unique in that the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) generally does not have a capital gains tax. This article will explore how New Zealand’s IRD views cryptocurrency and how cryptocurrencies are taxed. Be sure to listen in to the interview above with Tim Doyle for a more detailed explanation of New Zealand cryptocurrency taxation!
Classification
The New Zealand IRD currently classifies cryptocurrency as property that exists virtually. As such, cryptocurrency should be treated as property for taxation purposes. An important classification to note is mining. Mining crypto is considered a business and the proceeds are taxable as income, however the expenses incurred from purchasing equipment can be deducted.
Calculation: Income Tax on (Proceed) — (Cost Basis)
Example: If you purchase 1 BTC for $10,000 NZD (your cost basis) and sell it for $15,000 NZD (proceed), $5,000 NZD would be subject to income tax ($15,000 — $10,000).
Important dates
New Zealand’s tax year runs from 1 April to 31 March. 7 July is the due date for individuals filing without a tax accountant, with individuals filing with an accountant having until 31 March to file.
Taxation
New Zealand does not usually have capital gains tax, occuring only in rare instances. The IRD has two primary types of taxation methods: income and goods and services tax (GST). Currently all New Zealanders must pay income tax on cryptocurrency proceeds because they are considered taxable events.
The tax an individual pays on crypto depends on their individual income tax rate. If an individual has made income from crypto, an IR3 form needs to be filled out and most individuals will need to request a change to an IR3 filer. It remains unclear whether or not the GST act applies to crypto.
Taxable events
Any type of cryptocurrency transaction that results a tax liability is considered to be a taxable event. As noted previously, mining cryptocurrency is considered a profitable event and is classified as a business. All proceeds are taxable, with equipment costs serving as deductions.
Common taxable events:
Buying and holding crypto is not a tax event.
GST Act
The goods and services act imposes a 15% tax on goods and services on imported goods. New Zealand law remains unclear about whether the GST Act should be applied to cryptocurrency due to crypto’s non-physical nature. For now, owners of crypto should keep detailed records of their trading activity as the IRD are currently reviewing the applicableness of the GST Act on cryptocurrency.
Additional Resources:
https://www.newzealandnow.govt.nz/living-in-nz/money-tax/nz-tax-system
http://www.legislation.govt.nz/act/public/1985/0141/143.0/DLM82299.html
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Hopefully this is some solid information for anyone who trades crypto in NZ. I don't want to come off like I'm trying to sell a product, but any NZ Bitcoin.Tax users can use the code NZTAX for 15% off any Bitcoin.Tax plan. If mods want me to remove the % off bit, just let me know! We have a decent number of NZ users, and I'm sure some of them browse Reddit, so hopefully some people will benefit from the info + discount.
submitted by Sal-BitcoinTax to NZBitcoin [link] [comments]

Tax Treatment of Bitcoin and Crypto-currencies in South Africa Samuel and Co Trading - Episode 6: Bitcoin is Taxable How To Do Taxes For Bitcoin: Cryptocurrency Bitcoin and cryptocurrency TAXES EXPLAINED! Cryptocurrency tax professional New IRS Rules For Bitcoin And Crypto Holders. + SEC Rejects Bitwise ETF Proposal + Credits Shout-Out

There's a lot of confusion around how bitcoin is taxed, but there needn't be: Crypto assets like bitcoin enjoy remarkably favorable tax treatment from the IRS. Now, however, there are no more tax exemptions. US citizens and anyone with bitcoin mining operations in 2018 will have to pay taxes beginning in 2019. 2 Main Tax Categories. Another important aspect to consider is how you report cryptocurrency mining gains as a source of income. There are currently two options in the US. Bitcoin mining is the use of specialized computers to solve hashes (algorithmic equations) on a blockchain. The miners (people who own the computers), are paid for solving the hash and if they are part of a pool they get a share of the reward when the pool solves a hash. ... If bitcoin is used to purchase a good or service, is there a taxable ... Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies that you buy, sell, mine or use to pay for things can be taxable. Also, if your employer or client pays you in bitcoin or other cryptocurrency, that money is ... "Every bitcoin transaction is taxable," writes Tyson Cross, a tax attorney who specializes in virtual currencies. "Bitcoin users will have to calculate their gain or loss every time they purchase goods or services with bitcoin."

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Tax Treatment of Bitcoin and Crypto-currencies in South Africa

Bitcoin and crypto-currencies mining is not a tax-free exercise in South Africa! Watch this video now to learn how SARS applies normal income tax rules to crypto-currencies. Visit https://coiner ... #Bitcoin #Cardano #CryptoCrow https://CrowTrader.com - Algorithmic Crypto Trading Bot https://CrowMining.com - Co-Located Bitcoin Mining Farm NOTICE: All Paid Reviews And Features on my channel ... Paul Solman speaks with James White, director of tax issues at the Government Accountability Office, about the taxability of Bitcoin. In this episode Samuel Leach covers everything related to the cryptocurrency market. Which is better Bitcoin or Bitcoin Cash? Is Bitcoin a bubble? Is Bitcoin taxable? Make sure you like and ... #bitcoin #like #cryptocurrency #news #btc #ethereum #eth #cryptocurrency #litecoin #altcoin #altcoins #eos #forex #money #best #trading #bitcoinmining #invest #trader #cryptocurrencies #top # ...

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